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Shareholder report available Dec. 18

first_imgThe 2014 Annual Report of the Corporation Committee on Shareholder Responsibility (CCSR), a subcommittee of the President and Fellows, is now available on the Shareholder Responsibility Committees’ website.The report provides a detailed description of the CCSR’s actions on shareholder proposals regarding issues of social responsibility that came to vote during the 2014 spring proxy voting season (the period between March and June when most publicly traded corporations hold annual meetings). This year, the committees considered 56 proposals dealing with a wide range of issues of social responsibility, from company efforts to address global warming to adoption of policies for recycling; human rights; equal employment; corporate political contributions and lobbying; corporate charitable contributions; executive compensation; mortgage lending practices; and Internet policies regarding advertising, privacy, and neutrality.New topics addressed in 2014 included fast-food marketing practices and their possible connection to childhood obesity; corporate exposure to climate-change risk through lending, investing, and financing activities; and the development of principles to assess the impact of corporate tax strategies.The CCSR receives advice from the Advisory Committee on Shareholder Responsibility, a 12-member committee made up of Harvard faculty, students, and alumni.last_img read more

We’ve got your back’

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first installment in a three-part series discussing mental health at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s in recognition of national Mental Illness Awareness Week. After recognizing mental illness as an issue on all three local Holy Cross college campuses, student government leaders decided to address the often stigmatized topic by dedicating this entire week to promoting dialogue about mental health. The student leaders’ efforts coincide with national Mental Illness Awareness Week, which Congress established in 1990 in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ efforts to raise awareness of the issue. Although Saint Mary’s titled its week “Support a Belle, Love a Belle” and Notre Dame titled its week “Irish State of Mind,” the campuses are collaborating on events with the central theme of “We’ve Got Your Back,” Saint Mary’s student body president Kat Sullivan said. “We initially were going to call [the week] ‘You Are Not Alone’ because this is a community issue and something that we can work with as a tri-campus community, but we decided to go with ‘We’ve Got Your Back’ because we thought it really embodies the mission of all three colleges. … We are part of the Order of the Holy Cross community, and I think it is important for us to be there to support our community, no matter what we are facing.”  Lisa Anderson, president of the St. Joseph County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and a community fellow at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns, said college students across the nation face mental health issues because members of this age group are prone to developing mental illnesses. “The age for the onset of mental illness is typically from the teen years through the mid-20s, and stress is a huge contributor to either onset or making things worse in that paradigm,” Anderson said. “You are right at that age because of the development of things within your body that you have no control over.  “Those [things] are naturally happening during those years, and kids are under a lot of stress today. It is a bad combination, in one sense. If you have a vulnerability to some kind of mental illness, the chances of it happening in those years is pretty likely.” Sarah Senseman, Notre Dame student government director of constituent services, said Saint Mary’s sponsorship of Support a Belle, Love a Belle for the last two years served as inspiration for Irish State of Mind, but that inspiration was accompanied by a demand from the Notre Dame student body.  “Support a Belle, Love a Belle gave us the foundation for the week, but then feedback from the students allowed us to add a focus,” Senseman said. “Some students have given us feedback that they are not aware of the resources for mental health on campus. … We want to encourage students to use the campus’ resources more, to talk to each other more and to have a more positive outlook on the resources, which we have very many of.” Stephanie Klotter, Notre Dame student government director of residence life, said the collaborative group made sure events for the week were positive and showed hopeful ways in which people dealing with mental illness could combat the disease. “We thought it was important to show that mental health week is not just a bunch of events talking about depression, schizophrenia and anorexia,” Klotter said. “That would not be uplifting, nor would it be the message we want to send. We wanted to show that there are positive ways to deal with all of those issues – a way to overcome and show that things happen and there is a way to get past it and deal with mental illness in a happy and positive way.” With this goal in mind, the week’s events will appeal to as many people on campus as possible, Notre Dame student body vice president Nancy Joyce said.  “You have the panel for people who want to hear about the issue from their friends’ perspectives, as well as from the perspectives of administrators on campus,” Joyce said. “Then we have a speaker to talk more broadly about mental health for people interested in the issue in that way. Other events, like yoga on the quad, give people yet another opportunity to engage with the issue and to see what resources are available to them. “I think a lot of times, for people who are struggling with issues of mental health, the hardest part is engaging for the first time, so I think the more opportunities there are, then the more likely people who need help or who could use some support will find that somewhere in this six or seven events planned for the week.”  Since this week is a student-run initiative, Anderson said she expects the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s community to receive it well.  “Having the students start this dialogue on campus is the best way to get the message across,” she said. “I am a middle-aged mother. I can talk about the issue all I want. I am someone else. I am not them. I am not you. It is someone that is your own age, that is living in the same worldview, that is going to be able to relay this message. It will be more readily received from someone that is in your own circumstance.” Anderson said sponsoring events like this allows people to understand mental illness better as a disease. “Statistics say one out of every four American families either have either a relative or a friend who has some form of mental illness,” she said. “We tend to think of mental illness, unfortunately, as someone who has gone into Sandy Hook [School in Newtown, Conn.] and who has shot a bunch of people.”  But mental illnesses are medical diseases, Anderson said, and many students at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s face some sort of mental health issue.  “If people can understand that probably when you are walking around campus on any given day, one out of the four people you pass may have some form of mental illness, we can become more sensitive to all of our fellow human beings dealing with a mental illness,” Anderson said. “That way, we can improve our communication skills with people, instead of shunning people out.”  This week is about improving communication about mental health issues and ensuring that all students feel welcome in our campus communities, Joyce said.  “People are always there for each other on these campuses,” she said. “We are very family-oriented. … [It’s a] ‘You have been there for me, so I am going to be there for you’ kind of an idea.  “I don’t know if that exists on every college campus, but since it exists here at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross, then I think it is really important that we capitalize on that sense of community to help people that are struggling with mental health issues.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edu,Editor’s note: This is the first installment in a three-part series discussing mental health at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s in recognition of national Mental Illness Awareness Week. After recognizing mental illness as an issue on all three local Holy Cross college campuses, student government leaders decided to address the often stigmatized topic by dedicating this entire week to promoting dialogue about mental health. The student leaders’ efforts coincide with national Mental Illness Awareness Week, which Congress established in 1990 in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ efforts to raise awareness of the issue. Although Saint Mary’s titled its week “Support a Belle, Love a Belle” and Notre Dame titled its week “Irish State of Mind,” the campuses are collaborating on events with the central theme of “We’ve Got Your Back,” Saint Mary’s student body president Kat Sullivan said. “We initially were going to call [the week] ‘You Are Not Alone’ because this is a community issue and something that we can work with as a tri-campus community, but we decided to go with ‘We’ve Got Your Back’ because we thought it really embodies the mission of all three colleges. … We are part of the Order of the Holy Cross community, and I think it is important for us to be there to support our community, no matter what we are facing.”  Lisa Anderson, president of the St. Joseph County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and a community fellow at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns, said college students across the nation face mental health issues because members of this age group are prone to developing mental illnesses. “The age for the onset of mental illness is typically from the teen years through the mid-20s, and stress is a huge contributor to either onset or making things worse in that paradigm,” Anderson said. “You are right at that age because of the development of things within your body that you have no control over.  “Those [things] are naturally happening during those years, and kids are under a lot of stress today. It is a bad combination, in one sense. If you have a vulnerability to some kind of mental illness, the chances of it happening in those years is pretty likely.” Sarah Senseman, Notre Dame student government director of constituent services, said Saint Mary’s sponsorship of Support a Belle, Love a Belle for the last two years served as inspiration for Irish State of Mind, but that inspiration was accompanied by a demand from the Notre Dame student body.  “Support a Belle, Love a Belle gave us the foundation for the week, but then feedback from the students allowed us to add a focus,” Senseman said. “Some students have given us feedback that they are not aware of the resources for mental health on campus. … We want to encourage students to use the campus’ resources more, to talk to each other more and to have a more positive outlook on the resources, which we have very many of.” Stephanie Klotter, Notre Dame student government director of residence life, said the collaborative group made sure events for the week were positive and showed hopeful ways in which people dealing with mental illness could combat the disease. “We thought it was important to show that mental health week is not just a bunch of events talking about depression, schizophrenia and anorexia,” Klotter said. “That would not be uplifting, nor would it be the message we want to send. We wanted to show that there are positive ways to deal with all of those issues – a way to overcome and show that things happen and there is a way to get past it and deal with mental illness in a happy and positive way.” With this goal in mind, the week’s events will appeal to as many people on campus as possible, Notre Dame student body vice president Nancy Joyce said.  “You have the panel for people who want to hear about the issue from their friends’ perspectives, as well as from the perspectives of administrators on campus,” Joyce said. “Then we have a speaker to talk more broadly about mental health for people interested in the issue in that way. Other events, like yoga on the quad, give people yet another opportunity to engage with the issue and to see what resources are available to them. “I think a lot of times, for people who are struggling with issues of mental health, the hardest part is engaging for the first time. So I think the more opportunities there are, then the more likely people who need help or who could use some support will find that somewhere in this six or seven events planned for the week.”  Since this week is a student-run initiative, Anderson said she expects the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s community to receive it well.  “Having the students start this dialogue on campus is the best way to get the message across,” she said. “I am a middle-aged mother. I can talk about the issue all I want. I am someone else. I am not them. I am not you. It is someone that is your own age, that is living in the same worldview, that is going to be able to relay this message. It will be more readily received from someone that is in your own circumstance.” Anderson said sponsoring events like this allows people to better understand mental illness as a disease. “Statistics say one out of every four American families have either a relative or a friend who has some form of mental illness,” she said. “We tend to think of mental illness, unfortunately, as someone who has gone into Sandy Hook [School in Newtown, Conn.] and who has shot a bunch of people.”  But mental illnesses are medical diseases, Anderson said, and many students at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s face some sort of mental health issue.  “If people can understand that probably when you are walking around campus on any given day, one out of the four people you pass may have some form of mental illness, we can become more sensitive to all of our fellow human beings dealing with a mental illness,” Anderson said. “That way, we can improve our communication skills with people, instead of shunning people out.”  This week is about improving communication about mental health issues and ensuring that all students feel welcome in our campus communities, Joyce said.  “People are always there for each other on these campuses,” she said. “We are very family-oriented. … [It’s a] ‘You have been there for me, so I am going to be there for you’ kind of an idea.  “I don’t know if that exists on every college campus, but since it exists here at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross, then I think it is really important that we capitalize on that sense of community to help people that are struggling with mental health issues.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

Intilery agrees upon a new partnership with ProgressPlay

first_img Submit Share StumbleUpon Related Articles Fast Track’s Dan Morrison: Why now is the time to digitalise player engagement June 30, 2020 Share Optimove expands real-time dynamics to help betting meet new marketing demands August 27, 2019 The three C’s of digital customer experience within gaming July 6, 2020 Intilery has confirmed that it has agreed upon a new deal with ProgressPlay which will see them provide real-time customer engagement technology to the gaming platform.As part of the new partnership, ProgressPlay will have access to Intilery’s real-time, omnichannel AI CRM platform, which offers the chance to visualise and create real-time AI powered customer journeys. By using decision logic through a drag and drop interface and custom data sources, ProgressPlay can deliver messages tailored to their customers needs through Intilery’s real-time messaging systems, currently available to 130 brands.Gareth James, CEO of Intilery, commented on the new partnership:“Initlery are excited to have signed ProgressPlay, an Israeli Gaming Giant. Intilery has a proven track record and is at the forefront of real-time CRM in the gaming industry worldwide. Exciting times ahead.”In a bid to fully comprehend consumer behaviour, Intilery will fully utilise the integrated single-view of the customer to deliver real-time omnichannel messages.‘We chose Intilery due to their track record with leading gaming brands, their unique ability to deliver real-time messages and ease of use for managing our 130 brands. We look forward to building a long-lasting relationship with Intilery,” added Itai Loewenstein, CEO of Progress Play.last_img read more

4th Annual Thunder Bay Folk Festival

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisAs the weather cools off and fall begins to set in, opportunities to enjoy live music become increasingly rare. But this weekend will be a great time to listen to some tunes and enjoy the great outdoors, at the 4th annual Thunder Bay Folk Festival.Festivities kick off Friday at noon at the antique tractor and steam engine grounds on French road, north of Alpena. Folk musicians from all over will play from three different stages throughout the weekend, but organizers are placing a special emphasis on Michigan talent.“We’re getting musical acts from all over Michigan, and some beyond Michigan mainly for the purpose to give local people a chance to see some of these acts. There’s a lot of talent around Michigan, and we just want to showcase them here,” says festival VP Jeff Shea.The Thunder Bay Folk Festival has been making its appearance in Alpena for three years now, so for its fourth year organizers have planned something special.“New this year we’ve got a big country band for our headline. Stolen Horses, a band out of southern Michigan. Just a high energy country rock band that I think is really going to get the crowd dancing,” says Shea.Festival-goers can also enjoy over 20 different workshops and crafts, ranging from beginner’s ukulele lessons, to crafting driftwood wind chimes. Tickets for a weekend pass are $40 in advance…or $50 at the gate. You can pick them up at Joel’s Guitar Shop, Neiman’s Family Market, or visit their website at: www.thunderbayfolksociety.com.Organizers are also offering a local discount on Saturday night. Starting at 7pm, residents can purchase admission tickets for just $10 to enjoy an evening of folk music.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: alpena, Festival, Folk, Jeff Shea, thunder bayContinue ReadingPrevious Downtown Trash Clean-UpNext Fatal Crash Kills 2 and Sends 4 to the Hospital in Miolast_img read more

Attorney General asks for investigation of possible beef industry price-fixing

first_imgDES MOINES — A group of Attorneys General from 11 states — including Iowa — are asking the U.S. Department of Justice to start a federal investigation into suspected national price-fixing by meatpackers in the cattle industry.Iowa Attorney General spokesman Lynn Hicks says the coronavirus pandemic has magnified the issue. “The group of AG’s, which is bipartisan group is asking the DOJ for a thorough examination of the meatpacking industry,” Hicks says. “We feel that there is enough evidence here for alleged price-fixing and it’s time for the Department of Justice to look into this.”The concerns come as people are buying and stockpiling beef in response to the pandemic. “Antitrust concerns about the cattle market are nothing new — but we really feel like with the COVID-19 pandemic — it really shows the problems that both the consumers and cattle ranchers are facing right now,” Hicks says.Hicks says four packers control 80% of the beef market. “So it’s highly concentrated and meatpackers have all the power. And as such, they are able to charge high prices,” according to Hicks. “But, as we’ve seen lately, live cattle prices are the lowest they have been in years. They’re raising the prices and the consumers are buying, and the ranchers aren’t getting any benefit at all from this.”Hicks says they are hoping the DOJ will see the number of people calling for an investigation and act. “These are all Midwestern or western states that are cattle producers. It’s not just the Attorneys General who are raising concerns — Senator Grassley and some others have also sent letters to Attorney General Barr regarding this,” Hicks says. “We’re hoping for all of these voices, and the voices of Iowans and cattle producers will be heard in Washington.”Attorneys General in Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming all signed on to the letter.The letter comes on the same day that the Hy-Vee grocery store chain says it will start limiting the purchase of meat products to be prepared for any possible fluctuations in the product. Hy-Vee says in a statement that they have products available at stores –but due to worker shortages at plants as well as an increase in meat sales, customers may not find the specific items they want. Beginning Wednesday, each customer will be limited to four packages of a combination of fresh beef, ground beef, pork, and chicken.last_img read more