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Transform Your Work Experience With New Dell Monitors

first_imgAs more companies embrace a hybrid work model, it is critical to invest in technology that can help employees better collaborate no matter where they are working or what role they are in. From content creators and engineers to data analysts and marketers, we are all looking for that perfect office setup to help us be most productive. That’s exactly what our new commercial range of Dell monitors is all about: elevating work experiences and boosting employee productivity.Video conferencing made easy (and secure)We’ve introduced the world’s first video conferencing monitors certified for Microsoft Teams¹ – the Dell 24 Video Conferencing Monitor (C2422HE), Dell 27 Video Conferencing Monitor (C2722DE) and Dell 34 Curved Video Conferencing Monitor (C3422WE). You can now instantly join meetings with a one-touch dedicated Microsoft Teams button. The pop-up 5MP IR camera, dual 5W integrated speakers and noise-cancelling microphone allow you to collaborate with stunning video and audio clarity.  You will have a more secured and convenient login experience using facial recognition sign-in with Windows Hello and hands-free commands with Microsoft Cortana™. These video conferencing monitors also come with ComfortView Plus, our built in low blue light solution that reduces blue light emissions while delivering excellent color accuracy.Make way for immersive beautyThe Dell UltraSharp 40 Curved WUHD Monitor (U4021QW) is the world’s first 40-inch ultrawide curved WUHD (5120 x 2160) resolution monitor.²  It is the ideal monitor for content creators and data analysts to further boost productivity while delivering striking visuals. This monitor offers wide color coverage and excellent color performance while helping to optimize eye comfort with ComfortView Plus. You can charge your PC with up to 90W power charging thanks to Thunderbolt™ 3, enable fast data transfers with super speed USB 10Gbps³ and ethernet connection with RJ45. The Dell UltraSharp 38 Curved USB-C Hub Monitor (U3821DW) delivers an outstanding audio and video experience with vivid WQHD+ screen and integrated 9W speakers. Both monitors can automatically detect and connect to a second PC and front ports allow easy connections and charging of peripherals.When style mattersKnown for theirbrilliant color and virtually borderless InfinityEdge design, the Dell UltraSharp 24 and 27 USB-C Hub Monitors (U2422HE/U2722DE) offer a seamless edge-to edge view.  These stylish hub monitors are ideal for dual monitor set-ups and offer users a wide range of connectivity options, including RJ45 for ethernet, USB-C with up to 90W power delivery for charging of laptop, and super speed 10Gbps3 ports for quick transfers. The monitors are also available in non USB-C hub versions – Dell UltraSharp 24 and 27 Monitors (U2422H/U2722D). All four monitors come with always-on built-in ComfortView Plus.Upgrade your collaboration spacesFor those working from the office or in communal workspaces, team collaboration has never been easier with the Dell 65 / 55 4K Interactive Touch Monitors (C6522QT/C5522QT). The 20-point InGlass™ Touch enables multiple users to simultaneously write or draw in real-time with virtually zero lag. Users can rest their hands onscreen without generating unwanted marks with the new palm rejection feature. Dell’s exclusive screen drop feature is designed to improve reachability of the screen for users working at different heights. The Dell collaboration monitors also integrate with Dell Meeting Space Solutions, creating a complete conference room ecosystem with hardware, software and collaboration devices combined.Don’t believe us, check out our latest awards!We are proud that these monitors and client peripherals are honorees of the CES 2021 Innovation awards – the Dell UltraSharp 40 Curved WUHD Monitor (U4021QW), Dell UltraSharp 32 HDR PremierColor Monitor (UP3221Q), Alienware 25 Gaming Monitor (AW2521H) and Dell Mobile Adapter Speakerphone (MH3021P).Don’t forget the peripheralsFinally, no setup is complete without the new Dell Premier Rechargeable Wireless Mouse (MS7421W), a rechargeable mouse with a battery life that lasts up to six months on a full charge.4 Alternatively, if you prefer a combo, the new Dell Premier Multi-Device Wireless Keyboard and Mouse (KM7321W) offers one of the industry’s leading battery life at up to 36 months.5  The new Dell USB-C Mobile Adapter (DA310) features a comprehensive range of ports in a compact design to connect your devices, with the added ability to charge your PC.As the world’s number-one monitor company for seven consecutive years6, we are also committed to sustainability. We offer the most number of EPEAT Gold registered monitors globally.7  Learn more about our new monitors’ ENERGY STAR®, TCO and EPEAT Gold certifications and full monitor specifications in our press kit here.Check out Dell’s additional news and announcements in our press release here.Pricing & Availabilitylast_img read more

We’ve got your back’

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first installment in a three-part series discussing mental health at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s in recognition of national Mental Illness Awareness Week. After recognizing mental illness as an issue on all three local Holy Cross college campuses, student government leaders decided to address the often stigmatized topic by dedicating this entire week to promoting dialogue about mental health. The student leaders’ efforts coincide with national Mental Illness Awareness Week, which Congress established in 1990 in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ efforts to raise awareness of the issue. Although Saint Mary’s titled its week “Support a Belle, Love a Belle” and Notre Dame titled its week “Irish State of Mind,” the campuses are collaborating on events with the central theme of “We’ve Got Your Back,” Saint Mary’s student body president Kat Sullivan said. “We initially were going to call [the week] ‘You Are Not Alone’ because this is a community issue and something that we can work with as a tri-campus community, but we decided to go with ‘We’ve Got Your Back’ because we thought it really embodies the mission of all three colleges. … We are part of the Order of the Holy Cross community, and I think it is important for us to be there to support our community, no matter what we are facing.”  Lisa Anderson, president of the St. Joseph County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and a community fellow at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns, said college students across the nation face mental health issues because members of this age group are prone to developing mental illnesses. “The age for the onset of mental illness is typically from the teen years through the mid-20s, and stress is a huge contributor to either onset or making things worse in that paradigm,” Anderson said. “You are right at that age because of the development of things within your body that you have no control over.  “Those [things] are naturally happening during those years, and kids are under a lot of stress today. It is a bad combination, in one sense. If you have a vulnerability to some kind of mental illness, the chances of it happening in those years is pretty likely.” Sarah Senseman, Notre Dame student government director of constituent services, said Saint Mary’s sponsorship of Support a Belle, Love a Belle for the last two years served as inspiration for Irish State of Mind, but that inspiration was accompanied by a demand from the Notre Dame student body.  “Support a Belle, Love a Belle gave us the foundation for the week, but then feedback from the students allowed us to add a focus,” Senseman said. “Some students have given us feedback that they are not aware of the resources for mental health on campus. … We want to encourage students to use the campus’ resources more, to talk to each other more and to have a more positive outlook on the resources, which we have very many of.” Stephanie Klotter, Notre Dame student government director of residence life, said the collaborative group made sure events for the week were positive and showed hopeful ways in which people dealing with mental illness could combat the disease. “We thought it was important to show that mental health week is not just a bunch of events talking about depression, schizophrenia and anorexia,” Klotter said. “That would not be uplifting, nor would it be the message we want to send. We wanted to show that there are positive ways to deal with all of those issues – a way to overcome and show that things happen and there is a way to get past it and deal with mental illness in a happy and positive way.” With this goal in mind, the week’s events will appeal to as many people on campus as possible, Notre Dame student body vice president Nancy Joyce said.  “You have the panel for people who want to hear about the issue from their friends’ perspectives, as well as from the perspectives of administrators on campus,” Joyce said. “Then we have a speaker to talk more broadly about mental health for people interested in the issue in that way. Other events, like yoga on the quad, give people yet another opportunity to engage with the issue and to see what resources are available to them. “I think a lot of times, for people who are struggling with issues of mental health, the hardest part is engaging for the first time, so I think the more opportunities there are, then the more likely people who need help or who could use some support will find that somewhere in this six or seven events planned for the week.”  Since this week is a student-run initiative, Anderson said she expects the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s community to receive it well.  “Having the students start this dialogue on campus is the best way to get the message across,” she said. “I am a middle-aged mother. I can talk about the issue all I want. I am someone else. I am not them. I am not you. It is someone that is your own age, that is living in the same worldview, that is going to be able to relay this message. It will be more readily received from someone that is in your own circumstance.” Anderson said sponsoring events like this allows people to understand mental illness better as a disease. “Statistics say one out of every four American families either have either a relative or a friend who has some form of mental illness,” she said. “We tend to think of mental illness, unfortunately, as someone who has gone into Sandy Hook [School in Newtown, Conn.] and who has shot a bunch of people.”  But mental illnesses are medical diseases, Anderson said, and many students at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s face some sort of mental health issue.  “If people can understand that probably when you are walking around campus on any given day, one out of the four people you pass may have some form of mental illness, we can become more sensitive to all of our fellow human beings dealing with a mental illness,” Anderson said. “That way, we can improve our communication skills with people, instead of shunning people out.”  This week is about improving communication about mental health issues and ensuring that all students feel welcome in our campus communities, Joyce said.  “People are always there for each other on these campuses,” she said. “We are very family-oriented. … [It’s a] ‘You have been there for me, so I am going to be there for you’ kind of an idea.  “I don’t know if that exists on every college campus, but since it exists here at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross, then I think it is really important that we capitalize on that sense of community to help people that are struggling with mental health issues.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edu,Editor’s note: This is the first installment in a three-part series discussing mental health at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s in recognition of national Mental Illness Awareness Week. After recognizing mental illness as an issue on all three local Holy Cross college campuses, student government leaders decided to address the often stigmatized topic by dedicating this entire week to promoting dialogue about mental health. The student leaders’ efforts coincide with national Mental Illness Awareness Week, which Congress established in 1990 in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ efforts to raise awareness of the issue. Although Saint Mary’s titled its week “Support a Belle, Love a Belle” and Notre Dame titled its week “Irish State of Mind,” the campuses are collaborating on events with the central theme of “We’ve Got Your Back,” Saint Mary’s student body president Kat Sullivan said. “We initially were going to call [the week] ‘You Are Not Alone’ because this is a community issue and something that we can work with as a tri-campus community, but we decided to go with ‘We’ve Got Your Back’ because we thought it really embodies the mission of all three colleges. … We are part of the Order of the Holy Cross community, and I think it is important for us to be there to support our community, no matter what we are facing.”  Lisa Anderson, president of the St. Joseph County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and a community fellow at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns, said college students across the nation face mental health issues because members of this age group are prone to developing mental illnesses. “The age for the onset of mental illness is typically from the teen years through the mid-20s, and stress is a huge contributor to either onset or making things worse in that paradigm,” Anderson said. “You are right at that age because of the development of things within your body that you have no control over.  “Those [things] are naturally happening during those years, and kids are under a lot of stress today. It is a bad combination, in one sense. If you have a vulnerability to some kind of mental illness, the chances of it happening in those years is pretty likely.” Sarah Senseman, Notre Dame student government director of constituent services, said Saint Mary’s sponsorship of Support a Belle, Love a Belle for the last two years served as inspiration for Irish State of Mind, but that inspiration was accompanied by a demand from the Notre Dame student body.  “Support a Belle, Love a Belle gave us the foundation for the week, but then feedback from the students allowed us to add a focus,” Senseman said. “Some students have given us feedback that they are not aware of the resources for mental health on campus. … We want to encourage students to use the campus’ resources more, to talk to each other more and to have a more positive outlook on the resources, which we have very many of.” Stephanie Klotter, Notre Dame student government director of residence life, said the collaborative group made sure events for the week were positive and showed hopeful ways in which people dealing with mental illness could combat the disease. “We thought it was important to show that mental health week is not just a bunch of events talking about depression, schizophrenia and anorexia,” Klotter said. “That would not be uplifting, nor would it be the message we want to send. We wanted to show that there are positive ways to deal with all of those issues – a way to overcome and show that things happen and there is a way to get past it and deal with mental illness in a happy and positive way.” With this goal in mind, the week’s events will appeal to as many people on campus as possible, Notre Dame student body vice president Nancy Joyce said.  “You have the panel for people who want to hear about the issue from their friends’ perspectives, as well as from the perspectives of administrators on campus,” Joyce said. “Then we have a speaker to talk more broadly about mental health for people interested in the issue in that way. Other events, like yoga on the quad, give people yet another opportunity to engage with the issue and to see what resources are available to them. “I think a lot of times, for people who are struggling with issues of mental health, the hardest part is engaging for the first time. So I think the more opportunities there are, then the more likely people who need help or who could use some support will find that somewhere in this six or seven events planned for the week.”  Since this week is a student-run initiative, Anderson said she expects the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s community to receive it well.  “Having the students start this dialogue on campus is the best way to get the message across,” she said. “I am a middle-aged mother. I can talk about the issue all I want. I am someone else. I am not them. I am not you. It is someone that is your own age, that is living in the same worldview, that is going to be able to relay this message. It will be more readily received from someone that is in your own circumstance.” Anderson said sponsoring events like this allows people to better understand mental illness as a disease. “Statistics say one out of every four American families have either a relative or a friend who has some form of mental illness,” she said. “We tend to think of mental illness, unfortunately, as someone who has gone into Sandy Hook [School in Newtown, Conn.] and who has shot a bunch of people.”  But mental illnesses are medical diseases, Anderson said, and many students at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s face some sort of mental health issue.  “If people can understand that probably when you are walking around campus on any given day, one out of the four people you pass may have some form of mental illness, we can become more sensitive to all of our fellow human beings dealing with a mental illness,” Anderson said. “That way, we can improve our communication skills with people, instead of shunning people out.”  This week is about improving communication about mental health issues and ensuring that all students feel welcome in our campus communities, Joyce said.  “People are always there for each other on these campuses,” she said. “We are very family-oriented. … [It’s a] ‘You have been there for me, so I am going to be there for you’ kind of an idea.  “I don’t know if that exists on every college campus, but since it exists here at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross, then I think it is really important that we capitalize on that sense of community to help people that are struggling with mental health issues.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

NY Mail-In Voting Deluge Fuels Uncounted Ballots, Confusion

first_imgPixabay Image.ALBANY — New York’s quest to keep voters safe from COVID-19 by letting them vote by mail in the June primary has led to big delays in tabulating results, concerns about disenfranchisement — and questions about whether there will be an even bigger mess in the fall.Election officials say it will take them until early August to finish counting a tidal wave of absentee ballots that overwhelmed a system which typically handles only around 5% of the vote. About 1.8 million New Yorkers requested mail-in ballots for New York’s primary.Voting ended June 23, but the results of many races, including two closely watched congressional primaries, are still unknown.A bigger problem than the delays, though, is that thousands of votes cast in good faith are getting invalidated during the counting process, candidates and good-government activists say. Some ballots are being knocked out because voters forgot to sign and date them; others because envelopes lacked postmarks that would indicate whether the ballot was dropped in the mail in time to beat the voting deadline.President Donald Trump’s press secretary, Kayleigh Mcenany, in a press conference this week lambasted New York’s vote counting as an “absolute catastrophe” and a reason to question voting by mail.Candidates and voting rights groups, including the Brennan Center for Justice, are pushing state lawmakers to fix procedural problems now so the issues don’t repeat themselves in the general election in November, when even more people may try voting by mail.New York City elections officials have refused to release statistics on the number of invalidated votes. But Suraj Patel, a Democrat locked in a close primary race with U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney, said 30% of mail-in ballots received in the Brooklyn part of the congressional district were being rejected.“This election and New York’s response, including the Senate and the Assembly, is providing Donald Trump with a blueprint to game the November elections unless they act,” Patel said.The plan to let voters cast ballots by mail was hatched hastily and announced in April as the coronavirus outbreak was killing hundreds of people a day in New York City and its suburbs.In the midst of the crisis, the state never provided extra funds to prepare election workers who would be handling mailed ballots or to hire extra staff to count them.Many voters who applied for absentee ballots didn’t get them until the last minute, leaving them wondering whether they should vote in person or try the mail and potentially miss a deadline to have the envelope postmarked by June 23.Compounding that problem, the state’s attempt to make things easier for voters by giving them postage-paid return envelopes backfired: The U.S. Postal Service doesn’t usually put postmarks on that kind of metered mail, and while its policy is to to add the postmark to mailed ballots, it admits it failed to do so on some envelopes.Candidates and activists are now claiming in a lawsuit that thousands of properly cast ballots mailed in on time were invalidated because they lacked postmarks.The state Board of Elections said it’s too early to know how many ballots didn’t make it out to people in time, or were discarded because the Postal Service failed to postmark them.“It’s very unfortunate that the Postal Service was unable to fully carry out what they have acknowledged was their responsibility in postmarking the mail,” said state board of elections spokesman John Conklin.A spokesperson for the Postal Service said it is addressing the issue.Five states — Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Washington and Utah — have conducted all elections by mail for years with relatively streamlined systems, while 21 other states allow localities to opt into mail-in elections, according to National Conferences of State Legislatures.Common Cause New York Executive Director Susan Lerner called it “unacceptable and unfortunate” that so many absentee ballots are being disqualified.“Right now an absentee ballot can be discarded if a cautious voter puts tape on their envelope to make sure the ballot doesn’t fall out,” she said.Her group wants lawmakers to allow voters to request absentee ballots earlier and allow election workers to start counting absentee ballots sooner after Election Day.Lawmakers could revamp a system widely viewed as outdated. By Thursday evening, the state Senate passed bills to accept absentee ballots received by June 24, ensure voters fearful of catching COVID-19 at polls can vote by mail in November, and give absentee voters a chance to fix deficient ballots.Gov. Andrew Cuomo has voiced support for lawmakers tweaking the state law that lays out the time period when absentee ballots can be accepted.But it’s unclear whether New York will allow election workers to count all ballots lacking a postmark, including those received days after Election Day. Patel, Maloney and other candidates have called for Cuomo to update his executive order to protect June 23 primary voters from disenfranchisement.And lawmakers plan to hold a hearing in August on how election workers have handled the spike in absentee ballots.“We’re studying the issue from a system-wide point of view. And any changes we can make, we will,” Cuomo said. 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