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We’ve got your back’

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the first installment in a three-part series discussing mental health at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s in recognition of national Mental Illness Awareness Week. After recognizing mental illness as an issue on all three local Holy Cross college campuses, student government leaders decided to address the often stigmatized topic by dedicating this entire week to promoting dialogue about mental health. The student leaders’ efforts coincide with national Mental Illness Awareness Week, which Congress established in 1990 in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ efforts to raise awareness of the issue. Although Saint Mary’s titled its week “Support a Belle, Love a Belle” and Notre Dame titled its week “Irish State of Mind,” the campuses are collaborating on events with the central theme of “We’ve Got Your Back,” Saint Mary’s student body president Kat Sullivan said. “We initially were going to call [the week] ‘You Are Not Alone’ because this is a community issue and something that we can work with as a tri-campus community, but we decided to go with ‘We’ve Got Your Back’ because we thought it really embodies the mission of all three colleges. … We are part of the Order of the Holy Cross community, and I think it is important for us to be there to support our community, no matter what we are facing.”  Lisa Anderson, president of the St. Joseph County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and a community fellow at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns, said college students across the nation face mental health issues because members of this age group are prone to developing mental illnesses. “The age for the onset of mental illness is typically from the teen years through the mid-20s, and stress is a huge contributor to either onset or making things worse in that paradigm,” Anderson said. “You are right at that age because of the development of things within your body that you have no control over.  “Those [things] are naturally happening during those years, and kids are under a lot of stress today. It is a bad combination, in one sense. If you have a vulnerability to some kind of mental illness, the chances of it happening in those years is pretty likely.” Sarah Senseman, Notre Dame student government director of constituent services, said Saint Mary’s sponsorship of Support a Belle, Love a Belle for the last two years served as inspiration for Irish State of Mind, but that inspiration was accompanied by a demand from the Notre Dame student body.  “Support a Belle, Love a Belle gave us the foundation for the week, but then feedback from the students allowed us to add a focus,” Senseman said. “Some students have given us feedback that they are not aware of the resources for mental health on campus. … We want to encourage students to use the campus’ resources more, to talk to each other more and to have a more positive outlook on the resources, which we have very many of.” Stephanie Klotter, Notre Dame student government director of residence life, said the collaborative group made sure events for the week were positive and showed hopeful ways in which people dealing with mental illness could combat the disease. “We thought it was important to show that mental health week is not just a bunch of events talking about depression, schizophrenia and anorexia,” Klotter said. “That would not be uplifting, nor would it be the message we want to send. We wanted to show that there are positive ways to deal with all of those issues – a way to overcome and show that things happen and there is a way to get past it and deal with mental illness in a happy and positive way.” With this goal in mind, the week’s events will appeal to as many people on campus as possible, Notre Dame student body vice president Nancy Joyce said.  “You have the panel for people who want to hear about the issue from their friends’ perspectives, as well as from the perspectives of administrators on campus,” Joyce said. “Then we have a speaker to talk more broadly about mental health for people interested in the issue in that way. Other events, like yoga on the quad, give people yet another opportunity to engage with the issue and to see what resources are available to them. “I think a lot of times, for people who are struggling with issues of mental health, the hardest part is engaging for the first time, so I think the more opportunities there are, then the more likely people who need help or who could use some support will find that somewhere in this six or seven events planned for the week.”  Since this week is a student-run initiative, Anderson said she expects the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s community to receive it well.  “Having the students start this dialogue on campus is the best way to get the message across,” she said. “I am a middle-aged mother. I can talk about the issue all I want. I am someone else. I am not them. I am not you. It is someone that is your own age, that is living in the same worldview, that is going to be able to relay this message. It will be more readily received from someone that is in your own circumstance.” Anderson said sponsoring events like this allows people to understand mental illness better as a disease. “Statistics say one out of every four American families either have either a relative or a friend who has some form of mental illness,” she said. “We tend to think of mental illness, unfortunately, as someone who has gone into Sandy Hook [School in Newtown, Conn.] and who has shot a bunch of people.”  But mental illnesses are medical diseases, Anderson said, and many students at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s face some sort of mental health issue.  “If people can understand that probably when you are walking around campus on any given day, one out of the four people you pass may have some form of mental illness, we can become more sensitive to all of our fellow human beings dealing with a mental illness,” Anderson said. “That way, we can improve our communication skills with people, instead of shunning people out.”  This week is about improving communication about mental health issues and ensuring that all students feel welcome in our campus communities, Joyce said.  “People are always there for each other on these campuses,” she said. “We are very family-oriented. … [It’s a] ‘You have been there for me, so I am going to be there for you’ kind of an idea.  “I don’t know if that exists on every college campus, but since it exists here at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross, then I think it is really important that we capitalize on that sense of community to help people that are struggling with mental health issues.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edu,Editor’s note: This is the first installment in a three-part series discussing mental health at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s in recognition of national Mental Illness Awareness Week. After recognizing mental illness as an issue on all three local Holy Cross college campuses, student government leaders decided to address the often stigmatized topic by dedicating this entire week to promoting dialogue about mental health. The student leaders’ efforts coincide with national Mental Illness Awareness Week, which Congress established in 1990 in recognition of the National Alliance on Mental Illness’ efforts to raise awareness of the issue. Although Saint Mary’s titled its week “Support a Belle, Love a Belle” and Notre Dame titled its week “Irish State of Mind,” the campuses are collaborating on events with the central theme of “We’ve Got Your Back,” Saint Mary’s student body president Kat Sullivan said. “We initially were going to call [the week] ‘You Are Not Alone’ because this is a community issue and something that we can work with as a tri-campus community, but we decided to go with ‘We’ve Got Your Back’ because we thought it really embodies the mission of all three colleges. … We are part of the Order of the Holy Cross community, and I think it is important for us to be there to support our community, no matter what we are facing.”  Lisa Anderson, president of the St. Joseph County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness and a community fellow at Notre Dame’s Center for Social Concerns, said college students across the nation face mental health issues because members of this age group are prone to developing mental illnesses. “The age for the onset of mental illness is typically from the teen years through the mid-20s, and stress is a huge contributor to either onset or making things worse in that paradigm,” Anderson said. “You are right at that age because of the development of things within your body that you have no control over.  “Those [things] are naturally happening during those years, and kids are under a lot of stress today. It is a bad combination, in one sense. If you have a vulnerability to some kind of mental illness, the chances of it happening in those years is pretty likely.” Sarah Senseman, Notre Dame student government director of constituent services, said Saint Mary’s sponsorship of Support a Belle, Love a Belle for the last two years served as inspiration for Irish State of Mind, but that inspiration was accompanied by a demand from the Notre Dame student body.  “Support a Belle, Love a Belle gave us the foundation for the week, but then feedback from the students allowed us to add a focus,” Senseman said. “Some students have given us feedback that they are not aware of the resources for mental health on campus. … We want to encourage students to use the campus’ resources more, to talk to each other more and to have a more positive outlook on the resources, which we have very many of.” Stephanie Klotter, Notre Dame student government director of residence life, said the collaborative group made sure events for the week were positive and showed hopeful ways in which people dealing with mental illness could combat the disease. “We thought it was important to show that mental health week is not just a bunch of events talking about depression, schizophrenia and anorexia,” Klotter said. “That would not be uplifting, nor would it be the message we want to send. We wanted to show that there are positive ways to deal with all of those issues – a way to overcome and show that things happen and there is a way to get past it and deal with mental illness in a happy and positive way.” With this goal in mind, the week’s events will appeal to as many people on campus as possible, Notre Dame student body vice president Nancy Joyce said.  “You have the panel for people who want to hear about the issue from their friends’ perspectives, as well as from the perspectives of administrators on campus,” Joyce said. “Then we have a speaker to talk more broadly about mental health for people interested in the issue in that way. Other events, like yoga on the quad, give people yet another opportunity to engage with the issue and to see what resources are available to them. “I think a lot of times, for people who are struggling with issues of mental health, the hardest part is engaging for the first time. So I think the more opportunities there are, then the more likely people who need help or who could use some support will find that somewhere in this six or seven events planned for the week.”  Since this week is a student-run initiative, Anderson said she expects the Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s community to receive it well.  “Having the students start this dialogue on campus is the best way to get the message across,” she said. “I am a middle-aged mother. I can talk about the issue all I want. I am someone else. I am not them. I am not you. It is someone that is your own age, that is living in the same worldview, that is going to be able to relay this message. It will be more readily received from someone that is in your own circumstance.” Anderson said sponsoring events like this allows people to better understand mental illness as a disease. “Statistics say one out of every four American families have either a relative or a friend who has some form of mental illness,” she said. “We tend to think of mental illness, unfortunately, as someone who has gone into Sandy Hook [School in Newtown, Conn.] and who has shot a bunch of people.”  But mental illnesses are medical diseases, Anderson said, and many students at Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s face some sort of mental health issue.  “If people can understand that probably when you are walking around campus on any given day, one out of the four people you pass may have some form of mental illness, we can become more sensitive to all of our fellow human beings dealing with a mental illness,” Anderson said. “That way, we can improve our communication skills with people, instead of shunning people out.”  This week is about improving communication about mental health issues and ensuring that all students feel welcome in our campus communities, Joyce said.  “People are always there for each other on these campuses,” she said. “We are very family-oriented. … [It’s a] ‘You have been there for me, so I am going to be there for you’ kind of an idea.  “I don’t know if that exists on every college campus, but since it exists here at Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross, then I think it is really important that we capitalize on that sense of community to help people that are struggling with mental health issues.” Contact Kaitlyn Rabach at krabac01@saintmarys.edulast_img read more

A Whole New Musical: StarKid Brings Aladdin Parody Twisted to 54 Below

first_img A spoof of the 1992 Disney movie Aladdin (which is, of course, now a Broadway musical), Twisted premiered at the Greenhouse Theatre in Chicago in 2013. Just as Wicked revealed the real story of the Wicked Witch of the West, Twisted intriguingly promises to tell the story of Aladdin from the perspective of Ja’far, the Royal Vizier. Twisted features a score by A.J. Holmes (currently standby for Elder Cunningham in The Book of Mormon) and Kaley McMahon and a book by Matt Lang, Nick Lang and Eric Kahn Gale. Robert W. Schneider directs the concert, with music direction by Justin Fisher and orchestrations by Andrew Fox. For Twisted tickets and more info, click here. Get a sneak peek of Twisted from the YouTube video below! Got Aladdin fever? You’re not alone! The acclaimed theater troupe StarKid are bringing a concert version of their hit musical parody Twisted: The Untold Story of a Royal Vizier to 54 Below for two performances on March 17 at 7PM and 11:30PM. StarKid Productions (aka Team StarKid) was founded at the University of Michigan in 2009 by Glee star Darren Criss, Brian Holden, Matt Lang and Nick Lang. Best known for A Very Potter Musical, the company has also created the musicals Me and My Dick, Starship, Holy Musical B@man!, A Very Potter Sequel and A Very Potter Senior Year. Holmes will play Ja’far, joining Jeff Blim as Aladdin, Tyler Brunsman, Andrea Ross, Holly Grossman, Rebecca Spigelman and George Salazar (Godspell). View Commentslast_img read more

Algeria seal shootout win over Ivory Coast to book semi-final berth

first_imgSUEZ, Egypt (Reuters) – Experienced striker Wilfried Bony and midfielder Serey Die missed penalties in the shootout as Algeria sealed a 4-3 victory over the Ivory Coast following an entertaining 1-1 Africa Cup of Nations quarter-final draw on Thursday.Algeria will now meet Nigeria in the semi-finals at the Cairo International Stadium on Sunday as they seek to end their long wait for continental success that stretches back to 1990.Sofiane Feghouli put Algeria ahead in the first half, but they failed to increase that advantage when Baghdad Bounedjah missed a penalty early in the second period. Ivory Coast striker Jonathan Kodjia equalised just past the hour mark, after which both sides created chances and had efforts cleared off the line, but were unable to be separated in 120 minutes.Bony saw his weak penalty saved by Algerian goalkeeper Rais M’Bolhi, before captain Die struck the post to sink the 2015 Nations Cup champions and see the North African side advance to just a second semi-final in 29 years. Max Gradel’s curling 25-yard shot was tipped onto the post by a diving M’Bolhi as the Ivorians served notice of their early attacking intent.And it should have been 1-0 a few minutes later when the wizardry of Wilfried Zaha in the box saw him fashion a low cross that was perfect for Kodjia, who missed the ball completely. Algeria captain Riyad Mahrez fired wide at the other end, before they took the lead with a well-worked goal on 20 minutes.Full back Ramy Bensebaini picked up the loose ball on the left-hand side of the box and laid on a perfect pass for Feghouli to score.They could have made it 2-0 a minute into the second half when Ivory Coast goalkeeper Sylvain Gbohouo up-ended Bounedjah in the box, and after a consultation with the Video Assistant Referee, Bamlak Tessema Weyesa awarded the spot kick. Bounedjah took the penalty himself, but fired over off the crossbar.A few minutes later, Kodjia’s quick shot from a tight angle looped onto the woodwork, before the Aston Villa forward finally found the equaliser.Set free by Zaha on the right, he cut inside and let fly from the edge of the box, his shot arrowing into the bottom corner of the net. It was a first goal conceded by Algeria in the tournament.Mahrez then managed to beat Gbohouo with his low shot, but Mamadou Bagayoko did brilliantly to clear off the line.Ivorian Ismael Traore came closest to a winner in extra time when his scrambled shot from a corner was blocked on the line by Mehdi Zeffane.last_img read more